An old soldier:  the Mahler 9th as done by Dudamel & the LA Phil
All Reviews / Los Angeles Philharmonic / Music News & Info: Classical / Reviews 2011/2012

An old soldier: the Mahler 9th as done by Dudamel & the LA Phil

Clearly, Mahler was a guy who liked to think and compose about death.  Musical allusions to it show up in all of his works being performed as part of the Los Angeles Philharmonic’s “Mahler Project” (some may quibble about Songs of the Wayfarer, but if you’re singing about putting a red-hot knife in your breast, … Continue reading

Los Angeles Philharmonic / Music News & Info: Classical / Other classical music concerts and recitals (in So Cal and beyond)

Gershwin played on both coasts; recognizing a Strad blindfolded; some orchestral cabbage + mac & cheese

The Los Angeles Philharmonic’s all-Gershwin season opening gala may have occured many months ago,  but PBS’s “Great Performances” is only now getting around to broadcasting the video from the concert — most of it, anyway.  Better late (and abridged) than never. The first broadcast is this evening at 6pm Pacific Time (on KPBS and PBS … Continue reading

Fashionably late:  Salonen and the LA Phil take on lost-and-found Shostakovich
All Reviews / Los Angeles Philharmonic / Music News & Info: Classical / Reviews 2011/2012

Fashionably late: Salonen and the LA Phil take on lost-and-found Shostakovich

Esa-Pekka Salonen was back for his second week with the Los Angeles Philharmonic. With a world premiere of the abandoned opera, Orango, paired with the withdrawn-for-25-years Symphony No. 4, his all-Shostakovich concerts were a study of two contrasting works that had both been hidden and eventually brought to new light. To add to the lost-and-found theme, E-P himself … Continue reading

Listening to “Sirens” without being tied to a mast:  Salonen and the LA Phil with Ax, Hillborg, and Beethoven
All Reviews / Los Angeles Master Chorale / Los Angeles Philharmonic / Music News & Info: Classical / Reviews 2011/2012

Listening to “Sirens” without being tied to a mast: Salonen and the LA Phil with Ax, Hillborg, and Beethoven

Esa-Pekka Salonen is back, and there is much rejoicing. All the Los Angeles Philharmonic’s Conductor Laureate had to do was merely walk on stage Sunday afternoon, and the applause was enthusiastic and loud cheers were already audible. He didn’t disappoint. The first series of his two week stint was vintage Salonen. Continue reading

Two women and an orchestra:  Emmanuelle Haïm and Sonya Yoncheva debut with the LA Phil in an all-Händel program
All Reviews / Los Angeles Philharmonic / Music News & Info: Classical / Reviews 2011/2012

Two women and an orchestra: Emmanuelle Haïm and Sonya Yoncheva debut with the LA Phil in an all-Händel program

On paper, Sunday afternoon’s concerts belonged to conductor Emmanuelle Haïm.  The reality was that and much more.  Ms. Haïm dominated the concert.  Many musicians had solo turns of one sort or another, and two — oboist Ariana Ghez and recorder player (or is it recordist?) Rotem Gilbert — even played front and center.  Yet when it was … Continue reading

Yuja Wang and James Conlon triumph with the LA Phil
All Reviews / Los Angeles Philharmonic / Music News & Info: Classical / Reviews 2011/2012

Yuja Wang and James Conlon triumph with the LA Phil

Yuja Wang is the real deal. If there was any doubt that might have crept in as to whether or not she was a “serious” pianist and/or musician based on a spate of recent cancellations and a critic’s unfortunate comments about her attire at the Hollywood Bowl, let them be put to rest after this … Continue reading

The world we live in, and life in general:  LA Phil and Dudamel do Kurtág, Mozart (with Richard Goode), and Strauss
All Reviews / Los Angeles Philharmonic / Music News & Info: Classical / Reviews 2011/2012

The world we live in, and life in general: LA Phil and Dudamel do Kurtág, Mozart (with Richard Goode), and Strauss

I almost always go to classical music concerts because I feel I must see/hear something on the program:  a certain composer or his work, a soloist, maybe even a conductor.  Other times it’s because I’m curious about a world premiere of a new work or a performer I’ve never heard before.  This past Sunday at … Continue reading